/ before
Have you ever wondered where books come from? ↘

zwischendenstuehlen:

Well then, let me show you, because that’s what I do for a living.

Right now, it’s this time of the year, and the little ones have just freshly hatched:

image

You’ll notice they’re still blind and naked when they hatch. So I make them little coats to keep them warm…

(7:18pm)
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Through the Clouds, Night
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This year I will sleep more and cry more.
I will learn how to listen to my body,
How to feed her when she’s hungry
And not when she is bored, or lonely.
This year is about putting away apologies—
Shaking the old dust out of my bones,
Getting rid of people and places
That have stopped feeling like home.
.
This year is about the deep kind of soul searching
Reserved for brooding men in classic literature.
This year is for falling in love with all the ways
I am able to feel.
My world is vibrant and alive
And to numb myself would be to waste this body
To waste this breath.
.
Somewhere, billions of years ago,
A star died to put the marrow in my bones
And I ought to make good use of that.
.
I am the result of ten million factors all
Working against me ever coming into existence
And I am here anyway.
.
How could I forget that the same skin
That houses all my anxieties also holds
The same kind of rain that fills oceans?
I have a small lightning storm brewing
In the barrel of my ribs,
How could I forget that?
.
This year, I will be kind to my body,
Because she has always been kind to me.
Because she has entire orchestras beneath her fingernails,
And after so many years,
She deserves a good audience.
.
I am too young to feel so old.
This is the year I change that.

This Year, by Ashe Vernon (via latenightcornerstore)

(5:42pm)

(7:50pm)
rad-pax-personal:

nihilnovisubsole:

trashholmes:

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament
via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

well, you can tell by the way i use my walk im a woman’s man — no time to talk

please watch this and play this in another tab

omg
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When I met a truly beautiful girl, I would tell her that if she spent the night with me, I would write a novel or a story about her. This usually worked; and if her name was to be in the title of the story, it almost always worked. Then, later, when we’d passed a night of delicious love-making together, after she’d gone and I’d felt that feeling of happiness mixed with sorrow, I sometimes would write a book or story about her. Sometimes her character, her way about herself, her love-making, it sometimes marked me so heavily that I couldn’t go on in life and be happy unless I wrote a book or a story about that woman, the happy and sad memory of that woman. That was the only way to keep her, and to say goodbye to her without her ever leaving.

— Roman Payne (via observando)

(12:43am)

(8:06am)
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thetemperamentalgoat asked: Aww thank you! How far along are you?!

I’m right at fourteen weeks so have the majority of the pregnancy left.

(1:17pm)

Ten rape prevention tips:

1. Don’t put drugs in women’s drinks.

2. When you see a woman walking by herself, leave her alone.

3. If you pull over to help a woman whose car has broken down, remember not to rape her.

4. If you are in an elevator and a woman gets in, don’t rape her.

5. When you encounter a woman who is asleep, the safest course of action is to not rape her.

6. Never creep into a woman’s home through an unlocked door or window, or spring out at her from between parked cars, or rape her.

7. Remember, people go to the laundry room to do their laundry. Do not attempt to molest someone who is alone in a laundry room.

8. Use the Buddy System! If it is inconvenient for you to stop yourself from raping women, ask a trusted friend to accompany you at all times.

9. Carry a rape whistle. If you find that you are about to rape someone, blow the whistle until someone comes to stop you.

10. Don’t forget: Honesty is the best policy. When asking a woman out on a date, don’t pretend that you are interested in her as a person; tell her straight up that you expect to be raping her later. If you don’t communicate your intentions, the woman may take it as a sign that you do not plan to rape her.

— (via eatpraylonely)

(8:54pm)
At 19, I read a sentence that re-terraformed my head: “The level of matter in the universe has been constant since the Big Bang.”
In all the aeons we have lost nothing, we have gained nothing - not a speck, not a grain, not a breath. The universe is simply a sealed, twisting kaleidoscope that has reordered itself a trillion trillion trillion times over.
Each baby, then, is a unique collision - a cocktail, a remix - of all that has come before: made from molecules of Napoleon and stardust and comets and whale tooth; colloidal mercury and Cleopatra’s breath: and with the same darkness that is between the stars between, and inside, our own atoms.
When you know this, you suddenly see the crowded top deck of the bus, in the rain, as a miracle: this collection of people is by way of a starburst constellation. Families are bright, irregular-shaped nebulae. Finding a person you love is like galaxies colliding. We are all peculiar, unrepeatable, perambulating micro-universes - we have never been before and we will never be again. Oh God, the sheer exuberant, unlikely face of our existences. The honour of being alive. They will never be able to make you again. Don’t you dare waste a second of it thinking something better will happen when it ends. Don’t you dare.

— Caitlin Moran (via artvevo)

(5:31pm)
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likeanhornet:

1. City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco


Book appeal: City Lights was founded by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, so it makes sense that its entire second floor is a dedicated poetry space. But throughout the store there are chairs strategically placed so customers can not only enjoy the natural light, but take their time in choosing a title to bring home.
2. Word on the Water in London


Book appeal: This bookstore is on a barge, for starters. You can hop aboard to browse through its selection (and mingle with the owner’s cats), or stay on the mainland to see their poetry readings and live music, which happen on the roof of the barge.
3. Boekhandel Dominicanen in Maastricht, Netherlands


Book appeal: Browsing books in a 700-year-old church is an experience you’ll only have at Boekhandel Dominicanen. There’s a mix of Gothic architecture and modern furniture to enjoy, along with all of the titles, of course.
4. The Livraria Cultura in São Paulo, Brazil


Book appeal: Not only is this the largest bookstore in Brazil, but it’s also a borderline playground for kids. There are massive dragon statues to play on, areas to lounge, and four stories of pure book-filled aisles to wander through.
5. Libreria Acqua Alta in Venice, Italy


Book appeal: This bookstore is easily one of the most memorable and quirky places in Venice. The shop itself is small, and filled with books that fall out of gondolas, bathtubs, and small boats. You can dip your feet in the canal as you read, or climb a set of steps entirely made of old books.
6. Librería El Ateneo in Buenos Aires


Book appeal: This former theater turned bookstore is filled with all sorts of stunning architectural details, like Italian ceiling frescoes, rich red curtains, and ornate sculptures. Plus, there’s live piano music playing in the background while you browse each section.
7. Cook & Book in Brussels


Book appeal: Cook & Book is part bookstore, part café, and totally worth the visit. The shop is divided into nine rooms, and each room contains a different section (think music, fiction, children’s, travel, graphic novels, etc.). But best of all is that each section has its own special design and looks totally unique from the other rooms. There’s even an English room that looks a bit like a pub.
8. Brattle Book Shop in Boston


Book appeal: Founded in 1825, the Brattle Book Shop is one of the largest antiquarian book shops in the country. There are unique outdoor bookstalls, as well as three levels of titles to browse through.
9. Livraria Lello in Porto, Portugal


Book appeal: If you blink you’d miss the unassuming exterior of Livraria Lello. But inside, it’s filled with rich dark wood and a sweeping staircase that leads to a second floor of stained glass and floor to ceiling bookshelves. This is one of Portugal’s oldest bookstores and completely worth the visit.
10. Librairie Ptyx in Brussels


Book appeal: Even before you walk through the doors, it’s not hard to see that the Librairie Ptyx is a monument to all things art. Inside, titles are carefully curated, and the homages to famous writers covers the walls.
11. The Last Bookstore in Downtown Los Angeles


Book appeal: Aside from the vaulted ceilings and enormous pillars that fill this large space, stepping inside The Last Bookstore will make you feel like you’ve entered another world. There’s a mix of old and used books, and even an upstairs section where everything is just $1.
12. Cafebrería El Péndulo in Mexico City


Book appeal: Anywhere where they allow you to eat, drink mojitos, and read is pretty fantastic, in my opinion. Plus Cafebrería El Péndulo also offers outdoor seating, and enough natural light and vegetation to make you feel like you’re not in a bookstore at all.
13. Atlantis Books in Santorini, Greece


Book appeal: Stepping into Atlantis Books is a bit like going into a cave, but one filled with tons of character! There are notes and messages written all over the walls, and they host food festivals, film festivals, and book signings regularly.
14. Powell’s Books in Portland, Oregon


Book appeal: Powell’s is ENORMOUS. That’s because it was formerly a car dealership that has become a Portland landmark. If you ever feel like indie bookstores are flailing, walk through the rows of books while sipping coffee from their cafe and just remember that being a book lover is alive and well in Portland.
15. Librairie Avant-Garde in Nanjing, China


Book appeal: Can you spot the yellow stripe down the center of the book rows? That’s because Librairie Avant-Garde is a former garage converted into a bookstore. Pretty neat, but you’ll have to find parking elsewhere!
16. Dickson Street Bookshop in Fayetteville, Arkansas


Book appeal: Specializing in out of print and rare books, you’ll step off the main Fayetteville drag into this cozy shop filled with rows and rows of books old and new. The rare and more leather-bound options are right up front and absolutely stunning, while if you head into the back you can find anything from Southern cookbooks to music biographies.
17. Books Actually in Tiong Bahru, Singapore


Book appeal: This shop is a mix of quirky and modern, like the ultimate Etsy store filled with indie titles, local authors, and plenty of knickknacks to bring home. It’s small, but intimate, and readings are often hosted here.
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